Tag Archives: wordpress

Use Autoptimize effectively

Keeping your WordPress website fast can become pretty tricky once you start installing plugins and off-the-shelf themes. Everything seems to want to load at least one CSS stylesheet, and sometimes a dozen or more JavaScript script files. Some also inject great chunks of CSS and JavaScript into every page. Luckily, there’s the handy Autoptimize plugin to help you sort all of that out. Continue reading

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Move Gravity Forms field labels above input fields

Gravity Forms has some nice compound fields to make it easy to accept things like names, addresses, and credit card details. One annoying thing it does, though, is put the labels for the input fields below them instead of above them. Here’s how to move Gravity Forms field labels above input fields where most people would expect them to be. Continue reading

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Tracking WordPress plugin compatibility with Trello

For a while now, I’ve been using the amazing Trello to help me keep track of various tasks. Sure, I use various bug trackers like Mantis and GitHub Issues too, but for some of the more high-level tasks it’s just easier with Trello. One job it’s particularly good at is helping me keep track of plugin compatibility testing. Continue reading

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Load Gravity Forms scripts for custom field

Gravity Forms is a very easy to use yet flexible tool for building forms in WordPress. It uses quite a bit of JavaScript and custom CSS, so it’s careful to only load its scripts and stylesheets when needed. But if you put a form into a custom field, e.g via Advanced Custom Fields, how will Gravity Forms know it needs to load them? Continue reading

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Remove register link from WordPress wp-login.php

I recently had to enable user registrations on a WordPress multisite, so that shops on that site could allow customers to register. I don’t want users to register any other way, only through specific applications on specific subsites. Enabling user registrations adds a “register” link to the wp-login.php script page. That invites trouble! Continue reading

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Why I moved comments to Disqus

Running a blog, even a low-volume out-of-the-way blog like mine, attracts spammers. It’s a simple fact of life. If you have comments turned on, you will get spam. There’s lots of ways to deal with that, but no way to stop it coming. Lately, it’s been hammering the server hosting my blog, so I decided to change how I was dealing with spam by essentially outsourcing most of the problem to Disqus. Continue reading

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Remove the WordPress post date filter on custom post type admin pages

WordPress custom post types can be very useful for storing all sorts of different types of data in WordPress — and I should really write a post about that some time. But the date a post was published, i.e. its post_date, isn’t important for many custom post types. So why have a drop-down list of dates to filter your custom posts types by if you don’t need it? Continue reading

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Stop CloudFlare Rocketscript breaking WordPress plugin scripts

CloudFlare offers a service called Rocketscript, which compresses, concatenates, and defers any JavaScript on your web pages. On some websites, it can make a significant difference to the apparent page load time, because it waits until the web browser has loaded the page before it loads and executes scripts. Of course, that sometimes means it breaks things! Fortunately, CloudFlare offers a way to avoid that, and it’s possible to use it on your WordPress plugin scripts. Continue reading

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Use WP Migrate DB Pro and keep your development environment settings

I’ve been using the fabulous WP Migrate DB Pro since June; it makes it really easy to duplicate the data from one WordPress website onto another, something that developers need to do frequently, and it handles the problems of moving serialised data from one server to another without breaking it. When pulling data from a production server to a development or test environment, it also (by design) replaces all your settings, which might mean that test emails go to your clients — can anyone say, “Dear Rich Bastard?” Thankfully, it also offers a couple of save-your-backside solutions. Continue reading

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