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Yet another programmer blogging about code

Archive for the ‘How-to’ Category

Creating a custom gallery template for NextGEN Gallery

Friday, January 4th, 2013

NextGEN Gallery is one of the easiest to use image gallery plugins for WordPress, so we now try to use it wherever a website needs to have user-managed sets of images: sliders/carousels, trade/media galleries, scenic galleries, you name it. We can do that easily because NextGEN allows you to create custom gallery templates.

Stop turning off CURLOPT_SSL_VERIFYPEER and fix your PHP config

Wednesday, October 24th, 2012

As Pádraic Brady points out in a recent article about PHP security, there’s a whole lot of misinformation about how to deal with the error “SSL certificate problem, verify that the CA cert is OK” from curl. Nearly everyone advises that you turn CURLOPT_SSL_VERIFYPEER off (in fact, countless comments on the PHP manual page for curl_setopt tell you this). This is bad, because it allows your nice, encrypted stream of confidential data to be silently highjacked by a bad guy. Don’t do that! Instead, just fix your PHP installation so that it doesn’t get that error.

Different thumbnail sizes for NextGEN Galleries

Thursday, August 16th, 2012

Ok, so we’re allowed to have one (1) size option for thumbnails in all galleries, and they can be either cropped square, or not. This is my only option?

But what if I want to have a gallery page of all of the lovely staff for my clients website, and their photos have been sensibly taken in portrait format, I do NOT want the thumbnails for this gallery to be cropped, that would be just wrong. And then there is to be a page with a photo gallery of the staff picnic where people have enjoyed taking happy snaps in both landscape AND portrait formats because that is what suits, so I need these thumbnails cropped.

Running QEMU with port redirection through libvirt

Thursday, April 26th, 2012

Like many developers these days, I use a bunch of different virtual machine images to give me access to multiple development and test environments without having a room full of computers. My VM of choice is QEMU KVM, the kernel-based virtual machine bundled with Fedora. I’ve always used simple shell scripts to start my VMs, which has allowed me great flexibility, but yesterday I set one up using the nice Virtual Machine Manager (VMM) GUI application. And remembered why I wasn’t using it: there’s no way to tell it how to do TCP port redirection! But now, there is a way…