Load Gravity Forms stylesheets in page head

Gravity Forms normally loads its stylesheets in the page head, where they belong. It does that only on pages which have forms, which is nice. If you use a widget to host your form, however, it can’t detect that until it renders the widget… too late to load the stylesheets in the head. At that point, it just pulls them directly into the page body. Continue reading Load Gravity Forms stylesheets in page head

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Move Gravity Forms field labels above input fields

Gravity Forms has some nice compound fields to make it easy to accept things like names, addresses, and credit card details. One annoying thing it does, though, is put the labels for the input fields below them instead of above them. Here’s how to move Gravity Forms field labels above input fields where most people would expect them to be. Continue reading Move Gravity Forms field labels above input fields

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Load Gravity Forms scripts for custom field

Gravity Forms is a very easy to use yet flexible tool for building forms in WordPress. It uses quite a bit of JavaScript and custom CSS, so it’s careful to only load its scripts and stylesheets when needed. But if you put a form into a custom field, e.g via Advanced Custom Fields, how will Gravity Forms know it needs to load them? Continue reading Load Gravity Forms scripts for custom field

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Change the description on a Gravity Forms PayPal donation

Gravity Forms plus its PayPal add-on make for a very easy donations form (and so does my Gravity Forms eWAY add-on). But the PayPal item description is pretty formulaic, and probably doesn’t represent the donation very well especially when there are multiple options. A simple filter hook with a few lines of code can easily fix that though. Continue reading Change the description on a Gravity Forms PayPal donation

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Stop users from submitting Gravity Forms form twice

A common problem with input forms is that users get impatient and click the submit button twice. This can lead to double (or triple, or quadruple!) form submissions, which can really mess things up (especially if you’ve added a billing step to your form!) Stopping it can be surprisingly complex, but here’s a simple piece of browser script that will prevent most users from making multiple submissions with Gravity Forms. Continue reading Stop users from submitting Gravity Forms form twice

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Stored payments and Beagle anti-fraud protection for eWAY payment gateways

My eWAY payment gateways for WP e-Commerce and Gravity Forms now have some new features that should help some merchants building e-commerce solutions. Continue reading Stored payments and Beagle anti-fraud protection for eWAY payment gateways

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Gravity Forms now has a DPS PxPay credit card gateway

If you ever wanted to build an online donations form with Gravity Forms and bill people through DPS (apparently quite a popular payment gateway in New Zealand, also available in Australia and other countries), you now can thanks to some kind sponsorship. Using Payment Express (PxPay), you can have your form finish with a credit card payment, and you don’t even need to by an SSL certificate for your website. Click for more details.

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Overview of building custom fields for Gravity Forms

Gravity Forms is a great way to build all sorts of forms in WordPress. It can be so simple that non-programmers can easily build their own basic forms. It’s also incredibly flexible so programmers can extend it in myriad ways, even by adding some complex custom fields of their own. But as usual, there’s a trade-off — ease of use for non-programmers means lots of hoops to jump for programmers. Here’s an overview of how I built some fairly complex compound fields for a custom application using Gravity Forms. Continue reading Overview of building custom fields for Gravity Forms

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